Archive for October, 2008

This is Byron Hurt’s recent extension on his excellent critical documentary, Beyond Beats and Rhymes. The comparison between Barack Obama and 50 Cent is an easy target, however, it’s a good discussion piece. Compare the discussion here with the upcoming film Cash Rules (Click title above to view VIDEO trailer), starring Treach and J.D. Williams (aka “Bodie” from The Wire). The video below looks at issues of identity from the vantage point of young black girls. As bell hooks writes in her 1993 book, Sisters of the Yam, “decolonization refers to breaking with the ways our reality is defined and shaped by the dominant culture and asserting our understanding of that reality, of our own experience…Renewed Black liberation struggle can only be successful to the extent that it includes resistance to sexism.”

A Legislative Agenda for the First 100 Days
Bill Fletcher, Jr
Fall 2008 issue of New Labor Forum

Preface/The Setting

Two days after the November 2008 elections, Democrats and their allies are still celebrating the decisive defeat of Republican John McCain. With his defeat comes the chance to render unto history the remnants of the Bush/Cheney regime that so ruined the lives of the bottom 80 percent of the U.S. population, and turned most of the world against the U.S. Eight years of Bush/Cheney have brought incompetence, jingoism, and neoliberalism. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, disasters such as Hurricane Katrina, and the deepening economic crisis have served to discredit much of the conservative agenda, even going so far as to generate despair among the right-wing evangelical base.

Let’s imagine that, after several months of drafting, the final touches are being placed on what has come to be known as The First 100 Days: A Working People’s Agenda for the First 100 Days of the Incoming Democratic Administration. This project, initiated by members of the AFL-CIO, Change To Win, as well as several independent unions and other progressive working-class organizations, has identified several key areas where the new Democratic administration must take bold steps within its first 100 days.

[click on title at top of post to go to full article.]

A Legislative Agenda for the First 100 Days
Bill Fletcher, Jr
Fall 2008 issue of New Labor Forum

Preface/The Setting

Two days after the November 2008 elections, Democrats and their allies are still celebrating the decisive defeat of Republican John McCain. With his defeat comes the chance to render unto history the remnants of the Bush/Cheney regime that so ruined the lives of the bottom 80 percent of the U.S. population, and turned most of the world against the U.S. Eight years of Bush/Cheney have brought incompetence, jingoism, and neoliberalism. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, disasters such as Hurricane Katrina, and the deepening economic crisis have served to discredit much of the conservative agenda, even going so far as to generate despair among the right-wing evangelical base.

Let’s imagine that, after several months of drafting, the final touches are being placed on what has come to be known as The First 100 Days: A Working People’s Agenda for the First 100 Days of the Incoming Democratic Administration. This project, initiated by members of the AFL-CIO, Change To Win, as well as several independent unions and other progressive working-class organizations, has identified several key areas where the new Democratic administration must take bold steps within its first 100 days.

[click on title at top of post to go to full article.]

Paris – Don’t Stop the Movement (video)

Posted: October 14, 2008 by trggradio in Uncategorized

Paris hittin’ em hard again. New album in stores October 28, 2008.

With recent reports about voter disenfranchisement already underway in the 2008 election, we may do well to check out what happened in the recent past. American Blackout is a useful reminder of what occurred and what is occurring now, especially in swing states. According to the New York Times (10/8/2008), “The screening or trimming of voter registration lists in the six states — Colorado, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Nevada and North Carolina — could also result in problems at the polls on Election Day: people who have been removed from the rolls are likely to show up only to be challenged by political party officials or election workers, resulting in confusion, long lines and heated tempers. Some states allow such voters to cast provisional ballots. But they are often not counted because they require added verification. Although much attention this year has been focused on the millions of new voters being added to the rolls by the candidacy of Senator Barack Obama, there has been far less notice given to the number of voters being dropped from those same rolls.” [Click on title to see full story.]