New York Times July 4th Edition-Anticipating Positive Change

Posted: November 16, 2008 by trggradio in Uncategorized

The New York Times is looking forward to President-Elect Obama’s Administration reversing many of the draconian policies of the last eight years under the Bush Regime. Imagining the type of changes anticipated it put together a very insightful (and witty) issue envisioning home-based progressive change. It even contains some media justice info. Who would’ve thought the New York Times was even remotely interested in reforming mass media as we know it? Yeah, I wouldn’t hold my breath on that one either. Though they identify some key areas for organizing, I didn’t see the Prison Industrial Complex mentioned but maybe my eyes are watering over from grading papers all day. Nonetheless, here’s the reason behind the issue from the “Fine Print” section of the Front Page. Enjoy. -CT

The Fine Print
By NYTIMES EDITORIAL
Published: July 4th, 2009

This special edition of The New York Times comes from a future in which we are accomplishing what we know today to be possible.

The dozens of volunteer citizens who produced this paper spent the last eight years dreaming of a better world for themselves, their friends, and any descendants they might end up having. Today, that better world, though still very far away, is finally possible — but only if millions of us demand it, and finally force our government to do its job.

It certainly won’t be easy. Even now, corporate representatives are swarming over Washington to get their agendas passed. The energy giants are demanding “clean coal,” nuclear power and offshore drilling. Military contractors are pushing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. H.M.O.s and insurance companies are promoting bogus “reforms” so they can forestall universal health care. And they’re not about to take no for an answer.

But things are different this time. This time, we can hold accountable the politicians we put into office. And because everyone can now see that the “free market” has nothing to do with freedom, there is a huge opening to pass policies that can benefit all Americans, and that can make us truly free — free to pursue an education without debt, go on vacation every once in a while, keep healthy, and live without the crushing guilt of knowing what our tax dollars are doing abroad.

Following are just a few of the many, many groups working for change. Join them, support them, or start your own, and we can begin to make the news in this paper the news in every paper.

If you want to end the war in Iraq and prevent new wars: United for Peace and Justice (unitedforpeace.org), a coalition of that includes CODEPINK (codepink4peace.org), Iraq Veterans Against the War (ivaw.org), Peace Action (peace-action.org), War Resisters League (warresisters.org), and hundreds of others.

If you want to fight for health care: Healthcare-NOW (healthcare-now.org), Physicians for a National Health Care Program (pnhp.org), California Nurses Association (calnurse.org), Private Health Insurance Must Go Coalition (phimg.org), Single Payer New York.

If you want to save the environment: Climate Crisis Coalition (climatecrisiscoalition.org), 350 (350.org), Greenpeace (greenpeace.org), Earth Policy Institute (earth-policy.org), Rainforest Action Network (ran.org), Earth First! (earthfirst.org), Earthjustice (earthjustice.org), Friends of the Earth (foe.org), Natural Resources Defense Council (nrdc.org)

If you want economic justice: United for a Fair Economy (faireconomy.org), Too Much (toomuchonline.org), Jobs with Justice (jwj.org)

If you want to protect our civil liberties, civil rights and human rights: Center for Constitutional Rights (ccrjustice.org), ACLU (aclu.org), National Lawyers Guild (nlg.org), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (naacp.org), Global Exchange (globalexchange.org), PEN American Center (pen.org), Human Rights Watch (hrw.org), Defending Dissent Foundation (defendingdissent.org)

If you want to end torture: Witness Against Torture (witnesstorture.org), Amnesty International (amnestyusa.org), Act Against Torture (actagainsttorture.org), The Quaker Initiative to End Torture (quit-torture-now.org).

If you want to defend the rights of immigrants: New York Immigration Coalition (thenyic.org), National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (nnirr.org), Desis Rising Up and Moving (drumnation.org), New York United for Immigrant Rights (nyunitedforimmigrantrights.blogspot.com)

If you want to help eliminate worker exploitation: United Students Against Sweatshops (usas.org), Sweatshop Watch (sweatshopwatch.org), Wake Up Wal-Mart (wakeupwalmart.com)

If you want to end homelessness and promote affordable housing: National Coalition for the Homeless (nationalhomeless.org), National Low Income Housing Coalition (nlihc.org), National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty (nlchp.org), National Alliance to End Homelessness (endhomelessness.org), Coalition for the Homeless (coalitionforthehomeless.org), Picture the Homeless (picturethehomeless.org), Housing Works (housingworks.org), Metropolitan Council on Housing (metcouncil.net)

If you want to fight for a more democratic media: Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (fair.org), FreePress (freepress.net), Democracy Now! (democracynow.org), Reporters Without Borders (rsf.org), Committee to Protect Journalists (cpj.org)

If you want to create a more democratic media: MediaChannel (mediachannel.org), The Indypendent (indypendent.org), Common Dreams (commondreams.org), AlterNet (alternet.org), Cultures of Resistance (culturesofresistance.org), Indymedia (indymedia.org), Video Activist Network (videoactivism.org)

If you want to fight for women’s rights: National Organization For Women (now.org), A.C.L.U. Women’s Rights Project (aclu.org/womensrights), H.R.W. Women’s Rights (hrw.org/women), Feminist Majority (feminist.org).

If you want to defend LGBTQ rights: FIERCE (fiercenyc.org), Radical Homosexual Agenda (radicalhomosexualagenda.org), Sylvia Rivera Law Project (srlp.org), AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (actupny.org), Audre Lorde Project (alp.org).

http://www.nytimes-se.com/

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